The Kilmarnock Willow

The Kilmarnock Willow is the perfect choice for a small tree on the patio, providing interest all year round, in the form of catkins, fine foliage and a bold, architectural shape.

This architectural Kilmarnock Willow is the ideal subject for providing all-year-round interest on the patio or terrace. This densely-headed, weeping tree is grafted onto a straight stem and forms a bold shape, which can be best appreciated when set against the backdrop of a plain fence or wall, or a similar uncluttered surface. It is a small-growing tree that is ideal for growing in a container.

During the late Winter, the fountain-like tree is adorned with silky, silvery catkins, which look like droplets of dew on the branches. These become fluffy, yellow and much larger preceding the emergence of the striking foliage.

A wonderful sight

From Spring through to Autumn, the branches are covered with fine oval leaves, which are a dark green colour on the upper surfaces and grey beneath. When these fall, the bare branches form an attractive ‘skeleton’, which makes a wonderful sight when glistening with frost or snow.

PLANTING THE TREE

Place a few handfuls of large crocks into the bottom of the tub, making sure you cover the drainage hole. This will ensure that the compost drains adequately, yet will prevent it from leaching out when the plant is watered.

Choose a free-draining, loam-based compost in which to plant the Willow, adding up to a quarter by volume of horticultural grit to the mixture. Half fill the tub with compost, firming it as you go with your fingertips.

Remove the Willow from its pot, taking particular care to avoid damaging the roots.

Stand the rootball in the tub and turn it slowly until its best-looking side, in other words the most balanced, is facing towards the front of the tub.

Make sure the top of the rootball is about 2.5cm (1in) below the rim of the tub, adding or removing compost if it is not. Finally, fill in around the roots with more compost, firming all around to ensure that it is in contact with the roots.

19. July 2013 by Dave Pinkney
Categories: Fruit Trees | Comments Off on The Kilmarnock Willow

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