Category Archives for Boundaries – Hedging, Fencing

History of Hedges

HEDGES: THEIR PAST, PRESENT AND FUTURE Britain’s landscape has been extensively reshaped to accommodate changing farming methods – most noticeably, perhaps, by the creation of hedges in the 16th and 17th centuries to enclose fields, and now, in the 20th century, … Continue reading

08. July 2017 by Dave Pinkney
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Birds Nests in Fields and Hedgerows

Nest sites Field boundaries provide sheltered locations for nests. Numerous birds and small and large mammals build their nests in hedgerows, walls or banks for the food. shelter and easy access to other areas that they provide. Regular hedgerow-nesting birds … Continue reading

07. July 2017 by Dave Pinkney
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Garden Boundaries: Fence or Hedge?

TO FENCE OR TO HEDGE? It is likely that you will want or have to mark the boundaries of your garden, for security or a more decorative garden, or both. The quickest solution is obviously to erect a fence – … Continue reading

25. February 2015 by Dave Pinkney
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ULMUS (ELM) as a Hedgeplant

  (D = deciduous leaf losing) Ulmus procera (syn. U. campestris). When planted as a hedge, the English elm grows rapidly up to 10 ft., tolerates adverse conditions, and withstands hard clipping at any time of the year. Put in … Continue reading

23. November 2012 by Dave Pinkney
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SYRINGA (LILAC) as a Hedgeplant

(D = deciduous leaf losing) Syringa vulgaris, up to 7 ft. Lilac is usually grown for its flowers, and named varieties are obtainable in mauve, purple, pink, red and white. When grown as a formal hedge, and not as a … Continue reading

16. November 2012 by Dave Pinkney
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ROSMARINUS (ROSEMARY) as a Hedgeplant

(Evergreen) Rosmarinus officinalis, 3 to 4 ft., flourishes in mild and coastal areas, and likes well-drained or chalky soil and as much sunshine as possible. It bears blue flowers in early May and is very fragrant. Pinch out the tips … Continue reading

16. November 2012 by Dave Pinkney
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ROSA as a Hedgeplant

(Deciduous) Several species of rose can be used to make attractive flowering hedges. Plant 1-½ ft. apart in November if possible, though all roses may be planted throughout the winter provided there is no frost. The following make attractive screens … Continue reading

16. November 2012 by Dave Pinkney
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PYRACANTHA (FIRE THORN) as a Hedgeplant

(Evergreen) The bright green, leathery leaves make an attractive hedge whether the plants are clipped or not. The flowers are greenish-cream in June, and the red or orange berries persist for most of the winter. Trim in April, but do … Continue reading

16. November 2012 by Dave Pinkney
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PRUNUS as a Hedgeplant

(D = deciduous leaf losing and E = evergreen) Some of the deciduous cherries like Prunus cerasifera and P. avium make quite pleasing hedges, but the most useful member of the family is the evergreen laurel. Prunus laurocerasus (laurel) (E), … Continue reading

16. November 2012 by Dave Pinkney
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LIGUSTRUM (PRIVET) as a Hedgeplant

(semi-evergreen) The most ubiquitous hedge plant in the British Isles. It will tolerate a smoky atmosphere, wind, poor soil, and considerable neglect, and produces fragrant, dull white flowers in late July and August. 3 to 10 ft. Ligustrum ovalifolium (common … Continue reading

14. November 2012 by Dave Pinkney
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